(ASK & Need Solve) Masalah Dual Boot dengan Window

Pertanyaan umum seputar distribusi Ubuntu yang menjadi distro wajib members ubuntu-indonesia.com
User avatar
Hariezg
Posts: 4
Joined: 25 Apr 2012, 12:42

(ASK & Need Solve) Masalah Dual Boot dengan Window

Postby Hariezg » 01 Mar 2013, 03:10

Assalamu'alaikum Wr Wb
Salam Sejahtera


Ane merupakan Pengguna Linux lama tapi belum expert.
Dulu ane pakai Xubuntu dan itu single boot cuma xubuntu.

Sekarang Ane pakai Windows 7 dan mau dual boot dengan Linux.
Tapi masalahnya terjadi lagi gan
dan ini terjadi di laptop ane gan. Kalo Kompi sih tidak masalah.
Kenapa ?

Karena Setiap ane mau dual boot OS windows dan linux di laptop. Di bagian partisinya, windowsnya tidak terdeteksi sebagai sistem operasi. Jadi ane harus hapus seluruh harddisk untuk menginstal linuxnya. Kalau hapus harddisk ane kagak mau gan! soalnya data-datanya udah berjibun dan penting semua. Belum sempet di Backup. Kira-kira ada Solusi gak gan ??
[img:center]http://kkcdn-static.kaskus.co.id/images/2013/03/01/3488727_20130301125627.jpg[/img]

Ane install backtrack, zorin OS, Ubuntu Ultimate Edition, Ubuntu versi 10.10 ke Atas, Linux mint. Xubuntu. Lubuntu dan apapun Linuxnya tetep kayak gitu gan. Makanya ane bingung
User avatar
offline
Posts: 2672
Joined: 17 Feb 2010, 21:03
Location: Kebumen

Re: (ASK & Need Solve) Masalah Dual Boot dengan Window

Postby offline » 01 Mar 2013, 06:13

Hariezg wrote:Karena Setiap ane mau dual boot OS windows dan linux di laptop. Di bagian partisinya, windowsnya tidak terdeteksi sebagai sistem operasi. Jadi ane harus hapus seluruh harddisk untuk menginstal linuxnya. Kalau hapus harddisk ane kagak mau gan! soalnya data-datanya udah berjibun dan penting semua. Belum sempet di Backup. Kira-kira ada Solusi gak gan ??

btw itu sudah dicoba setting manual partisinya?
btw kamu ada partisi kosong gak yah utk tempat dipasang linux nantinya?kalo gak ada maka buat aja dulu partisi kosong utk linuxnya via windows,lalu baru kamu install linuxnya di partisi itu.jangan lupa pas pilih partisinya di manual mode
cmiiw
User avatar
blackshirt
Posts: 2336
Joined: 02 Jan 2010, 17:00
Location: Solo dan Kebumen
Contact:

Re: (ASK & Need Solve) Masalah Dual Boot dengan Window

Postby blackshirt » 01 Mar 2013, 06:16

kalo baca dari sini, http://superuser.com/questions/254506/l ... on-install
Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). This new system is a simulation of RAID (so not new at all) plus some other gadgets most normal users will never understand the use of. One of the differences involved is the use of a different partition description block scheme from the standard MBR, the so called Microsoft GPT. In other words, the disk's index introduced by Microsoft differs substancially from that used by the MBR standard. Consequence of this is no other than Microsoft's tools can recognise and correctly understand where the partitions are located and what kind of they are.

Since Linux disk partitioning tools work on the standard MBR system (as most if not all other operating systems), they cannot interpret Microsoft's DD and its GPT' s index. Consequence of this is that a DD partitioned disk is recognised as free as there is no MBR descriptor data. Only to give a chance to recover documents and other files from DD partitions, some additions have been made to the Linux kernel already, to enable it to deal with such hard disk zones. AFAIK further compatibility code is in the way.
Therefore don't forget that Linux doesn't need to continuously try to become compatible with Microsoft's nonstandards...

For the moment, to have Linux dualbooting, you have to force Windows to use the MBR standard and not the Microsoft's own DD. The Linux partitioning tools can then recognize the present Windows MBR partitions and are then able to correctly install Linux and the boot code (GRUB...) for dualbooting. Therefore this strategy is mostly valid if Windows 7 has been already installed this way.

Beware of a suspicious possible risky situation! If you have multiple hard disks on your system partitioned with Windows 7 DD in one of the GPT modes, while installing Linux on one HD different from the first one (C: on Windows), you may be successful on having dualbooting. The problem is that Windows 7, depending on how you have configured your hard disks, may detect a volume failure if such a volume is spanned over the physical HD now used by Linux. You may loose much Windows data this way. Fact is the entire volume, so not only the part physically contained by the said hard disk may be lost with all its data.

So the only rule to follow, for now, is a precise planning from Windows 7 of the MBR partition configuration, avoiding this way the use of multi-hard-disk spanned volumes, reserving the space for the Linux installation and then proceeding with the Linux install.

The big problem is the Windows user must become comfortable (!) with the Dynamic Disc system before being able to modify the partitions setup and make the necessary disk space for the Linux installation.

To conclude, the introduction of the Dynamic-Disk system by Microsoft, is not really a techniocal problem for the Linux-Windows coexistance. At the moment the Linux community is working on this Microsoft novelty to save Windows users from screwing-up their Windows systems while trying to install Linux. To have this additional strategy fully working requires Linux partitioning tools to be aware of non standard partitioning schemes. This maybe introduced very soon as it is a simple modification even if different Windows partition structures may require different approaches to reach a correct setup for the new operating system coexistent installation.

kebiasaan microsoft, Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). :D :D

kalo baca ini lagi http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1744799
ada tool fixparts, http://www.rodsbooks.com/fixparts/


tapi tentu saja resiko kehilangan data ditanggung sendiri :D
User avatar
Hariezg
Posts: 4
Joined: 25 Apr 2012, 12:42

Re: (ASK & Need Solve) Masalah Dual Boot dengan Window

Postby Hariezg » 01 Mar 2013, 06:33

Ane Coba Gan!

Tapi kalo ane pilih Opsi ke 3.

Itu menghapus data di Windows 7 gak yah ?

Saya Sudah Pernah Buat partisi manual di Windows 7 untuk Linux ubuntu. dan hasilnya sama. tidak terdeteksi. harddisknya sudah saya set ke primary maupun secondary (sejenis itulah)
User avatar
Hariezg
Posts: 4
Joined: 25 Apr 2012, 12:42

Re: (ASK & Need Solve) Masalah Dual Boot dengan Window

Postby Hariezg » 01 Mar 2013, 06:38

blackshirt wrote:kalo baca dari sini, http://superuser.com/questions/254506/l ... on-install
Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). This new system is a simulation of RAID (so not new at all) plus some other gadgets most normal users will never understand the use of. One of the differences involved is the use of a different partition description block scheme from the standard MBR, the so called Microsoft GPT. In other words, the disk's index introduced by Microsoft differs substancially from that used by the MBR standard. Consequence of this is no other than Microsoft's tools can recognise and correctly understand where the partitions are located and what kind of they are.

Since Linux disk partitioning tools work on the standard MBR system (as most if not all other operating systems), they cannot interpret Microsoft's DD and its GPT' s index. Consequence of this is that a DD partitioned disk is recognised as free as there is no MBR descriptor data. Only to give a chance to recover documents and other files from DD partitions, some additions have been made to the Linux kernel already, to enable it to deal with such hard disk zones. AFAIK further compatibility code is in the way.
Therefore don't forget that Linux doesn't need to continuously try to become compatible with Microsoft's nonstandards...

For the moment, to have Linux dualbooting, you have to force Windows to use the MBR standard and not the Microsoft's own DD. The Linux partitioning tools can then recognize the present Windows MBR partitions and are then able to correctly install Linux and the boot code (GRUB...) for dualbooting. Therefore this strategy is mostly valid if Windows 7 has been already installed this way.

Beware of a suspicious possible risky situation! If you have multiple hard disks on your system partitioned with Windows 7 DD in one of the GPT modes, while installing Linux on one HD different from the first one (C: on Windows), you may be successful on having dualbooting. The problem is that Windows 7, depending on how you have configured your hard disks, may detect a volume failure if such a volume is spanned over the physical HD now used by Linux. You may loose much Windows data this way. Fact is the entire volume, so not only the part physically contained by the said hard disk may be lost with all its data.

So the only rule to follow, for now, is a precise planning from Windows 7 of the MBR partition configuration, avoiding this way the use of multi-hard-disk spanned volumes, reserving the space for the Linux installation and then proceeding with the Linux install.

The big problem is the Windows user must become comfortable (!) with the Dynamic Disc system before being able to modify the partitions setup and make the necessary disk space for the Linux installation.

To conclude, the introduction of the Dynamic-Disk system by Microsoft, is not really a techniocal problem for the Linux-Windows coexistance. At the moment the Linux community is working on this Microsoft novelty to save Windows users from screwing-up their Windows systems while trying to install Linux. To have this additional strategy fully working requires Linux partitioning tools to be aware of non standard partitioning schemes. This maybe introduced very soon as it is a simple modification even if different Windows partition structures may require different approaches to reach a correct setup for the new operating system coexistent installation.

kebiasaan microsoft, Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). :D :D

kalo baca ini lagi http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1744799
ada tool fixparts, http://www.rodsbooks.com/fixparts/


tapi tentu saja resiko kehilangan data ditanggung sendiri :D
blackshirt wrote:kalo baca dari sini, http://superuser.com/questions/254506/l ... on-install
Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). This new system is a simulation of RAID (so not new at all) plus some other gadgets most normal users will never understand the use of. One of the differences involved is the use of a different partition description block scheme from the standard MBR, the so called Microsoft GPT. In other words, the disk's index introduced by Microsoft differs substancially from that used by the MBR standard. Consequence of this is no other than Microsoft's tools can recognise and correctly understand where the partitions are located and what kind of they are.

Since Linux disk partitioning tools work on the standard MBR system (as most if not all other operating systems), they cannot interpret Microsoft's DD and its GPT' s index. Consequence of this is that a DD partitioned disk is recognised as free as there is no MBR descriptor data. Only to give a chance to recover documents and other files from DD partitions, some additions have been made to the Linux kernel already, to enable it to deal with such hard disk zones. AFAIK further compatibility code is in the way.
Therefore don't forget that Linux doesn't need to continuously try to become compatible with Microsoft's nonstandards...

For the moment, to have Linux dualbooting, you have to force Windows to use the MBR standard and not the Microsoft's own DD. The Linux partitioning tools can then recognize the present Windows MBR partitions and are then able to correctly install Linux and the boot code (GRUB...) for dualbooting. Therefore this strategy is mostly valid if Windows 7 has been already installed this way.

Beware of a suspicious possible risky situation! If you have multiple hard disks on your system partitioned with Windows 7 DD in one of the GPT modes, while installing Linux on one HD different from the first one (C: on Windows), you may be successful on having dualbooting. The problem is that Windows 7, depending on how you have configured your hard disks, may detect a volume failure if such a volume is spanned over the physical HD now used by Linux. You may loose much Windows data this way. Fact is the entire volume, so not only the part physically contained by the said hard disk may be lost with all its data.

So the only rule to follow, for now, is a precise planning from Windows 7 of the MBR partition configuration, avoiding this way the use of multi-hard-disk spanned volumes, reserving the space for the Linux installation and then proceeding with the Linux install.

The big problem is the Windows user must become comfortable (!) with the Dynamic Disc system before being able to modify the partitions setup and make the necessary disk space for the Linux installation.

To conclude, the introduction of the Dynamic-Disk system by Microsoft, is not really a techniocal problem for the Linux-Windows coexistance. At the moment the Linux community is working on this Microsoft novelty to save Windows users from screwing-up their Windows systems while trying to install Linux. To have this additional strategy fully working requires Linux partitioning tools to be aware of non standard partitioning schemes. This maybe introduced very soon as it is a simple modification even if different Windows partition structures may require different approaches to reach a correct setup for the new operating system coexistent installation.

kebiasaan microsoft, Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). :D :D

kalo baca ini lagi http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1744799
ada tool fixparts, http://www.rodsbooks.com/fixparts/


tapi tentu saja resiko kehilangan data ditanggung sendiri :D
blackshirt wrote:kalo baca dari sini, http://superuser.com/questions/254506/l ... on-install
Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). This new system is a simulation of RAID (so not new at all) plus some other gadgets most normal users will never understand the use of. One of the differences involved is the use of a different partition description block scheme from the standard MBR, the so called Microsoft GPT. In other words, the disk's index introduced by Microsoft differs substancially from that used by the MBR standard. Consequence of this is no other than Microsoft's tools can recognise and correctly understand where the partitions are located and what kind of they are.

Since Linux disk partitioning tools work on the standard MBR system (as most if not all other operating systems), they cannot interpret Microsoft's DD and its GPT' s index. Consequence of this is that a DD partitioned disk is recognised as free as there is no MBR descriptor data. Only to give a chance to recover documents and other files from DD partitions, some additions have been made to the Linux kernel already, to enable it to deal with such hard disk zones. AFAIK further compatibility code is in the way.
Therefore don't forget that Linux doesn't need to continuously try to become compatible with Microsoft's nonstandards...

For the moment, to have Linux dualbooting, you have to force Windows to use the MBR standard and not the Microsoft's own DD. The Linux partitioning tools can then recognize the present Windows MBR partitions and are then able to correctly install Linux and the boot code (GRUB...) for dualbooting. Therefore this strategy is mostly valid if Windows 7 has been already installed this way.

Beware of a suspicious possible risky situation! If you have multiple hard disks on your system partitioned with Windows 7 DD in one of the GPT modes, while installing Linux on one HD different from the first one (C: on Windows), you may be successful on having dualbooting. The problem is that Windows 7, depending on how you have configured your hard disks, may detect a volume failure if such a volume is spanned over the physical HD now used by Linux. You may loose much Windows data this way. Fact is the entire volume, so not only the part physically contained by the said hard disk may be lost with all its data.

So the only rule to follow, for now, is a precise planning from Windows 7 of the MBR partition configuration, avoiding this way the use of multi-hard-disk spanned volumes, reserving the space for the Linux installation and then proceeding with the Linux install.

The big problem is the Windows user must become comfortable (!) with the Dynamic Disc system before being able to modify the partitions setup and make the necessary disk space for the Linux installation.

To conclude, the introduction of the Dynamic-Disk system by Microsoft, is not really a techniocal problem for the Linux-Windows coexistance. At the moment the Linux community is working on this Microsoft novelty to save Windows users from screwing-up their Windows systems while trying to install Linux. To have this additional strategy fully working requires Linux partitioning tools to be aware of non standard partitioning schemes. This maybe introduced very soon as it is a simple modification even if different Windows partition structures may require different approaches to reach a correct setup for the new operating system coexistent installation.

kebiasaan microsoft, Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). :D :D

kalo baca ini lagi http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1744799
ada tool fixparts, http://www.rodsbooks.com/fixparts/


tapi tentu saja resiko kehilangan data ditanggung sendiri :D
blackshirt wrote:kalo baca dari sini, http://superuser.com/questions/254506/l ... on-install
Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). This new system is a simulation of RAID (so not new at all) plus some other gadgets most normal users will never understand the use of. One of the differences involved is the use of a different partition description block scheme from the standard MBR, the so called Microsoft GPT. In other words, the disk's index introduced by Microsoft differs substancially from that used by the MBR standard. Consequence of this is no other than Microsoft's tools can recognise and correctly understand where the partitions are located and what kind of they are.

Since Linux disk partitioning tools work on the standard MBR system (as most if not all other operating systems), they cannot interpret Microsoft's DD and its GPT' s index. Consequence of this is that a DD partitioned disk is recognised as free as there is no MBR descriptor data. Only to give a chance to recover documents and other files from DD partitions, some additions have been made to the Linux kernel already, to enable it to deal with such hard disk zones. AFAIK further compatibility code is in the way.
Therefore don't forget that Linux doesn't need to continuously try to become compatible with Microsoft's nonstandards...

For the moment, to have Linux dualbooting, you have to force Windows to use the MBR standard and not the Microsoft's own DD. The Linux partitioning tools can then recognize the present Windows MBR partitions and are then able to correctly install Linux and the boot code (GRUB...) for dualbooting. Therefore this strategy is mostly valid if Windows 7 has been already installed this way.

Beware of a suspicious possible risky situation! If you have multiple hard disks on your system partitioned with Windows 7 DD in one of the GPT modes, while installing Linux on one HD different from the first one (C: on Windows), you may be successful on having dualbooting. The problem is that Windows 7, depending on how you have configured your hard disks, may detect a volume failure if such a volume is spanned over the physical HD now used by Linux. You may loose much Windows data this way. Fact is the entire volume, so not only the part physically contained by the said hard disk may be lost with all its data.

So the only rule to follow, for now, is a precise planning from Windows 7 of the MBR partition configuration, avoiding this way the use of multi-hard-disk spanned volumes, reserving the space for the Linux installation and then proceeding with the Linux install.

The big problem is the Windows user must become comfortable (!) with the Dynamic Disc system before being able to modify the partitions setup and make the necessary disk space for the Linux installation.

To conclude, the introduction of the Dynamic-Disk system by Microsoft, is not really a techniocal problem for the Linux-Windows coexistance. At the moment the Linux community is working on this Microsoft novelty to save Windows users from screwing-up their Windows systems while trying to install Linux. To have this additional strategy fully working requires Linux partitioning tools to be aware of non standard partitioning schemes. This maybe introduced very soon as it is a simple modification even if different Windows partition structures may require different approaches to reach a correct setup for the new operating system coexistent installation.

kebiasaan microsoft, Windows 7 uses a "new" proprietary approach on managing hard disks, Dynamic Disk (DD). :D :D

kalo baca ini lagi http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=1744799
ada tool fixparts, http://www.rodsbooks.com/fixparts/


tapi tentu saja resiko kehilangan data ditanggung sendiri :D
blackshirt wrote:kalo baca dari sini, http://superuser.com/questions/254506/l ... on-install


tapi tentu saja resiko kehilangan data ditanggung sendiri :D


hahaha sama donk gan! ane belum siap
User avatar
offline
Posts: 2672
Joined: 17 Feb 2010, 21:03
Location: Kebumen

Re: (ASK & Need Solve) Masalah Dual Boot dengan Window

Postby offline » 01 Mar 2013, 06:51

Hariezg wrote:Ane Coba Gan!

Tapi kalo ane pilih Opsi ke 3.

Itu menghapus data di Windows 7 gak yah ?

Saya Sudah Pernah Buat partisi manual di Windows 7 untuk Linux ubuntu. dan hasilnya sama. tidak terdeteksi. harddisknya sudah saya set ke primary maupun secondary (sejenis itulah)

kalau menurutku sih mending datanya dibekup semuanya aja deh,baru repartisi total semuanya
User avatar
Hariezg
Posts: 4
Joined: 25 Apr 2012, 12:42

Re: (ASK & Need Solve) Masalah Dual Boot dengan Window

Postby Hariezg » 01 Mar 2013, 07:10

yogieza wrote:
Hariezg wrote:Ane Coba Gan!

Tapi kalo ane pilih Opsi ke 3.

Itu menghapus data di Windows 7 gak yah ?

Saya Sudah Pernah Buat partisi manual di Windows 7 untuk Linux ubuntu. dan hasilnya sama. tidak terdeteksi. harddisknya sudah saya set ke primary maupun secondary (sejenis itulah)

kalau menurutku sih mending datanya dibekup semuanya aja deh,baru repartisi total semuanya


OKE DEH berarti lain kali aja instalnya :(

Return to “Pertanyaan Umum”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 7 guests